From a Good to a Great Website: 9 Ways to Engage More Successfully

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What makes a great website?

What makes a website great for your customers?

What makes a website great for your potential customers?

The answers to these questions will help you to publish a successful website. One that encourages current and potential customers to both see and engage with your content. And hopefully buy your products and services too!

I published a post on this topic years ago, which included the seven things that must be on your website. It is “The 7 essentials of Customer Centric Websites.” and still makes a useful (and short) read, even today.

One of the major changes since then, is that today, with mobile more likely to be the screen of reference, we have gone from a “no scroll” to a “must-scroll” format. Words have given way to more images and now also to videos. We have gone from information to entertainment, from push to pull, and from “ours” to “theirs.”

The “Top nine attributes of effective websites” is a post published by Craig Reardon on smartcompany.com.au. It explains what makes a good website for small businesses. I found it to be a great starting point for my topic for any sized business, so I would encourage you to check it out as well.

Still, I do have a couple of criticisms about the post – sorry Craig. It starts with technology and also includes company rather than customer priorities. But you, fellow customer centricity champions, know that everything should start with the customer! So I’d like to build on both his post and my earlier one, to lay out what it takes to win online these days.

9 Essentials of a Customer Centric Website

Checking a website is often the first step a customer makes when they are interested in a brand or manufacturer. Therefore we should ensure that ours responds to their needs, whatever the reason for their visit. I have chosen the nine essential elements of a customer centric website below.

Please let me know what you think, by adding a comment below.

1. It’s for the customer, not (just) you

Although your website is about you and your company and/or brands, it is your customers, both current and potential, that need to like it.

Therefore, start by thinking about for whom you are developing the site and what their desires and needs are. Use our  4W™ template to ensure you go as deep as possible in your understanding of them. I also suggest you read12 things you need to know about your target customers for more on what you should know in order to understand them and be able to describe them in depth.

2. An intuitive structure

We don’t have time to read, let alone learn how to navigate a website. Customers will leave if they can’t immediately find what they are looking for. This explains why many – dare I say most? – businesses have a 50% plus bounce rate. (See the RocketFuel analysis for more on this)

It may still be necessary to have a sitemap for those visitors who need help in navigating or are less logical. However, it no longer needs the prominence it once did. Put it at the bottom of the page and don’t waste valuable real estate by placing it at the top.

If you make it easy for people to find what they are looking for, they will never need to revert to a sitemap, and even less to leave for a competitor’s website.

3. Customers can contact you however they want

Contact links or your full details must appear on the home page, including telephone numbers, email, postal and street addresses, and social media accounts. With the global nature of the internet, a customer has the right to know where you are based.

Do away with impersonal forms and drop-down menus, which force customers to use your classification. Instead, make them feel special, valued and appreciated. Make them feel like you are waiting to hear from them, and that you want to know what they have to share or ask. Above all, customers want to be treated as individuals, not as just one insignificant member of a mass.

4. Full details of your products, brands and services

Today’s customers demand information. They want details about ingredients, sourcing, limitations of usage, distribution and availability.

They want reassurance about your practices. Are they sustainable? Is your vision acceptable and your practices ethical? The more information you provide, the less need people will have to contact you with such requests for more information.

One more recent addition to this already long list, is company purpose. There is a lot of debate about whether or not customers care about companies and brands, but the covid pandemic has brought company support to the forefront. The best have been able to demonstrate their purpose through their actions. McKinsey wrote a great article on the topic that  I highly recommend. It’s called “Demonstrating corporate purpose in the time of coronavirus.”

5. Details about your company

Anonymous websites are no longer tolerated. Customers demand to know with whom they are engaging. So you can no longer hide who you are, as mentioned above. But customers need far more than just your contact details.

A detailed “About” section must also be provided, with clear information about all aspects of the company. Topics to include are your management structure, operational areas, mission statement, values, strategy, culture, and if you have one, your company societal purpose too. You also need to add the latest company news, both for investors and customers.

With the continued rise in the interest of visual content, incorporate a media section too. In it, you can provide images and films of your products and advertising. This will ensure that your brands are correctly presented online, as everyone will have access to professional, quality photos and videos.

[bctt tweet=”A company website should include a media section. This will ensure that your brands are correctly identified online, as everyone will have access to professional, quality photos and videos. #CompanyMedia #Advertising #Brands” username=”Denysech”]

This visual section also has one further advantage. That of making it easy for customers to both comment on and share their favourite ones. Advertising, in particular, is popular for sharing on social media, so make sure you have the best possible selection of both the latest and historical but popular material available.

6. Valuable content

Regularly updated content is good for your SEO rankings as well as for appealing to customers. Think about the topics of most interest to them. Perhaps you could answer common questions they have through a FAQ section or blog. Or provide useful recipes, styling tips or other relevant information that your customers will find appealing. Frequently added new content will also have people coming back to visit your site more often.

As mentioned above, visual content is vital today as people read less. If you struggle to create sufficient new content, or just want to get your customers more involved with your brands, then inviting them to provide it is a win-win for both of you.

User-generated content (UGC) as it is called, enables customers to share their real-life experiences with your brands, products and services. You can take advantage of this by offering space for them to add photos, videos and comments. Their stories help convey your brand’s values to other people and build trust.

Purina has been doing this successfully for many years, as owners love to show off their pets. They have even turned user-generated content into advertising. And many other brands have been inspired by what their customers share with them. For an insightful overview of some of the best campaigns, I highly recommend “14 Inspiring User Generated Content Campaigns.”

7. A responsive design

We are all multi-screen users today, moving seamlessly from smartphone to tablet, and from a laptop to TV. We expect the same quality of experience no matter what screen we are using. So a great website needs to be optimised for this.

I am always amazed when I view a website that is not optimised for mobile; it really does negatively impact the customers’ experience and will certainly damage the brand’s image in the medium term.

A further reason for having a responsive design is that in the last year or so Google has started to penalise those which are not optimised. Your potential customers may never learn about you because you won’t appear on the first pages of search results.

8. Engaging content and entertainment

Even if your customers come to your website looking for information, they are often also expecting some form of entertainment. Whether through useful tips and guides, or quizzes, games and competitions, customers demand to be surprised and delighted by their experiences online.

We all love to learn more about ourselves and the rapid rise of fitness bands and Facebook quizzes are a clear indication of this. Who can resist an invitation to discover “What your favourite colour means” or “What your favourite foods say about you”? or “How male/female is your brain?”  Incidentally, the second one was developed by Unilever’s Knorr brand.

I bet you just clicked or plan to click on one of those links, didn’t you?! See how powerful quizzes can be?

And don’t forget our very own C3C Evaluator™ for assessing how customer centric you are.

9.   High level of security

Companies record more and more information about their customers than ever before. At least we now have the possibility to define what we are willing to share and what we are not. However I, like many of you too I am sure, never bother going into the details of the cookies we are asked to approve.

But in return, we all expect their details to be kept safe. While it remains your responsibility to ensure a secure environment, you can also help, by only asking for details that you will immediately use for business purposes.

Do you really need telephone numbers if you will never call or text? Do you need postal addresses, occupation or other details that may be possible to collect? By only requesting the information that you will use, you will not only reduce the chance of being hacked, due to the lower value of your database, but you also risk losing fewer customers than you would if you require detailed information, especially at the beginning of the relationship before trust has been built. You can always build up your information on your customers over time and they are happier to provide it to you.

Of course, no matter how much information you collect from your customers, you need to protect your database from cyber attacks, whether the risk is high or low.

When I wrote the original post on customer centric websites, I mentioned Reckitt Benckiser as a best-in-class example. Today, when I look at the leading CPG / FMCG websites, I find many that deserve a mention. I, therefore, decided to ask you, the reader, to vote for your favourite customer centric website and why you consider it to be a great example? Please share your ideas below in the comments.

And if your own website doesn’t pass the above nine essentials test, perhaps it’s time to make some changes? We can help with a detailed website audit which will pinpoint how to optimise it for your customers’ experience.

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