When “Prove You Know Me” Personalization is Essential

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A few months ago, I published a post arguing that marketers who want to improve the effectiveness of personalized marketing should focus primarily on making personalization pragmatically useful to recipients. This argument was based on the results of several research studies, including a 2018 survey by Gartner/CEB that polled more than 2,500 consumers in North America, Europe, and Asia-Pacific.

One objective of this study was to identify what types of personalized messages are most effective. Survey participants were asked several questions about the content of personalized messages they had recently received. From the participants’ responses, Gartner/CEB identified two types of personalization based on what consumers perceived was the primary intent of the message:



  • “Prove You Know Me” Personalization – Consumers perceived that these types of messages were primarily intended to demonstrate that the company “knows” the recipient. So, for example, they may have explicitly mentioned a previous purchase made by the recipient, or they might have mentioned that the recipient had recently viewed a particular product.
  • “Help Me” Personalization – Consumers perceived that these types of messages were primarily intended to help the recipient in some way. For example, they may have made it easier for the recipient to complete a purchase, or helped the recipient understand how to better use a product.
To measure the comparative effectiveness of these types of persosnalization, Gartner/CEB created a “Commercial Benefit Index” that considered four consumer intent and behavior factors – brand intent, purchase, repurchase, and increase in shopping cart size. When Gartner/CEB analyzed the impact produced by each type of personalization, they found that “Help Me” personalization produced a 16% increase in the CBI, while “Prove You Know Me” personalization resulted in a 4% decline in the CBI.
Where “Prove You Know Me” Personalization Really Helps
As any good lawyer will tell you, “There’s an exception to every rule.” The evidence is clear that “helpfulness” is the most powerful driver of effective personalization. But there are some points in your relationship with a customer or prospect where demonstrating that you “know” him or her can be critical to advancing the relationship.
One of these points is when you are seeking to have the first person-to-person conversation with a prospect. Many prospects prefer to conduct early-stage research and information gathering on their own, and to avoid conversations with vendor reps until later in their decision-making process. Overcoming this reluctance is difficult, and that’s where an injection of “Prove You Know Me” personalization can be highly effective.
To illustrate this point, below is the text of an email message that I recently received from a client development representative at a sales technology company. I received this message after attending one of the company’s webinars. I’ve altered the text to conceal the real names of the company and the rep.
“David,
Thanks for attending our webinar with Jones & Company, “The Secret Sauce for a High-Performing Sales Organization.”
Hopefully, you enjoyed the webinar – John and Joe had some great insights on . . .
  • The current state and challenges of sales enablement in the age of the modern business buyer
  • Why a buyer-centric sales enablement approach is vital to an organization’s revenue growth
  • How the right software can accelerate sales enablement efforts and help win more deals


Would love to get your feedback from the webinar.
Are you available this Friday for a quick 15 minute chat?
Best,
Roger Smith”

On the surface, this appears to be a well-constructed email. It’s concise and not overly promotional. But it didn’t convince me to reply and schedule a telephone conversation. What “Roger” failed to do in this message is show me that he knew some basic things about me and my business, and explain why a telephone conversation could be worthwhile.
If “Roger” had spent two or three minutes scanning through my LinkedIn profile, he would have gained a basic understanding of what I do. My profile also contains links to the 127 articles that I’ve published at LinkedIn. If “Roger” had spent another two of three minutes scanning through the titles of these articles, he could have obtained a pretty good understanding of my professional interests and focus.
With this information, “Roger” could have easily added a short paragraph to the email that would have made me more inclined to schedule a telephone conversation. That paragraph could have looked something like this:
“I see from your LinkedIn profile that you work with B2B companies to develop marketing strategies and marketing content. I also noticed that you’ve written several articles about improving marketing and sales productivity. I’d like to get your thoughts about the role that sales enablement technology plays in improving sales productivity.
Are you available this Friday for a brief telephone conversation?”
This approach would have demonstrated that “Roger” had made an effort to “get to know” me and my business, and the proposed topic of the telephone conversation is one that could be useful for both “Roger” and me.
Some readers may be thinking:  “There’s no way we can have our business development reps spend this much time on every prospect.” That’s not what I’m recommending. This approach is reserved for prospects whose engagement with your company suggests that they may be ready to take the relationship to a higher level by beginning to have person-to-person conversations with your reps.

Image courtesy of Marco Verch (trendingtopics) via Flickr CC.



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