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TrenDemon and Adinton Offer Attribution Options

David Raab | Nov 8, 2017 23 views No Comments

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I wrote a couple weeks ago about the importance of attribution as a guide for artificial intelligence-driven marketing. One implication was I should pay more attention to attribution systems. Here’s a quick look at two products that tackle different parts of the attribution problem: content measurement and advertising measurement.

TrenDemon

Let’s start with TrenDemon. Its specialty is measuring the impact of marketing content on long B2B sales cycles. It does this by placing a tag on client Web sites to identify visitors and track the content they consume, and then connecting client CRM systems to find which visitor companies ultimately made a purchase (or reached some other user-specified goal). Visitors are identified by company using their IP address and as individuals by tracking cookies.

TrenDemon does a bit more than correlate content consumption and final outcomes. It also identifies when each piece of content is consumed, distinguishing between the start, middle, and end of the buying journey. It also looks at other content metrics such as how many people read an item, how much time they spend with it, and how many read something else after they’re done. These and other inputs are combined to generate an attribution score for each item. The system uses the score to identify the most effective items for each journey stage and to recommend which items should be presented in the future.



Pricing for TrenDemon starts at $800 per month. The system was launched in early 2015 and is currently used by just over 100 companies.

Adinton

Next we have Adinton, a Barcelona-based firm that specializes in attribution for paid search and social ads. Adinton has more than 55 clients throughout Europe, mostly selling travel and insurance online. Such purchases often involve multiple Web site visits but still have a shorter buying cycle than complex B2B transactions.

Adinton has pixels to capture Web ad impressions as well as Web site visits. Like TrenDemon, it tracks site visitors over time and distinguishes between starting, middle, and finishing clicks. It also distinguishes between attributed and assisted conversions. When possible, it builds a unified picture of each visitor across devices and channels.

The system uses this data to calculate the cost of different types of click types, which it combines to create a “true” cost per action for each ad purchase. It compares this with the clients’ target cost per actions to determine where they are over- or under-investing.

Adinton has API connections to gather data from Google AdWords, Facebook Ads, Bing Ads, AdRoll, RocketFuel, and other advertising channels. An autobidding system can currently adjust bids in AdWords and will add Facebook and Bing adjustments in the near future. The system also does keyword research and click fraud identification. Pricing is based on number of clicks and starts as low as $299 per month for attribution analysis, with additional fees for autobidding and click fraud modules. Adinton was founded in 2013.  It launched its first product in 2014 although attribution came later.

Further Thoughts

These two products are chosen almost at random, so I wouldn’t assign any global significance to their features. But it’s still intriguing that both add a first/middle/last buying stage to the analysis. It’s also interesting that they occupy a middle ground between totally arbitrary attribution methodologies, such as first touch/last touch/fractional credit, and advanced algorithmic methods that attempt to calculate the true incremental impact of each touch. (Note that neither TrenDemon nor Adinton’s summary metric is presented as estimating incremental value.)

 Of course, without true incremental value, neither system can claim to develop an optimal spending allocation. One interpretation might be that few marketers are ready for a full-blown algorithmic approach but many are open to something more than the clearly-arbitrary methods. So perhaps systems like TrenDemon and Adinton offer a transitional stage for marketers (and marketing AI systems) that will eventually move to a more advanced approach.

 An alternative view would be the algorithmic methods will never be reliable enough to be widely accepted.  This would see these intermediate systems as about as far as most marketers ever will or should go towards measuring marketing program impact. Time will tell.

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