My Google+ vs. Twitter Click-Through Experiment

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I was fortunate enough to luck into a few Spotify invitations earlier today, so I decided to try a little experiment in checking out click-through rates on Google+ vs. Twitter. I put similar offers up on Twitter and Google+ at the same time (7:38am PDT on a Thursday), and checked to see what drove traffic over to the blog. (I turned off comments on the Google+ offer, so folks could only go to the blog and to not split the sample.)

Twitter Offer

Screen shot 2011-07-28 at 7.12.33 PM

Google+ Offer

Screen shot 2011-07-28 at 7.14.41 PM

 
To give a little more context, here are the relative sizes of those two groups. Not exacty the same size, but close:

  • Twitter: 5,352 followers
  • Google+: 4,010 people have me in Circles

I then grabbed my referrer data to that post on the blog over the period of a few hours after these both went up.

Over that time, I had about 60 clicks recorded in the logs. I was surprised to find the raw number of click-throughs from Google+ was about 4x what it was from Twitter, even though the followship was a little smaller. (There’s also a big group with "no referrer," that could have come from clients or other sources.)

Number of click throughs, by source

2011-07-28_1926

 
So, it’s a small sample size, but it’s still notable, I think. I’ll be interested to see what kinds of experiences others have as they try similar experiments. Thoughts?

Update: Tac Anderson notes in the comments that "you can pretty much count 90% of those no referrer directly to Twitter clients." So, if that’s the case, we’re at about parity on the click-through rate between Twitter and Google+, with Twitter being slightly higher in aggregate between the traffic explictly attributed to Twitter and adding in the ‘no referrer’ traffic that likely came from Twitter clients.

Republished with author's permission from original post.

Christopher Carfi
Ant's Eye View
Social Business strategist advising clients such as Google, HP, Cisco, P&G and others.

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