Getting Emotional at Dunkin Donuts, and Over Social Selling

0
92

Share on LinkedIn

 daydream

As I approached the window of my local Dunkin’ Donuts the woman said, “How are you today?”  I paid her and then replied, “I’m fine, and you?”  My response had an extreme delay.  Then she asked if I needed a tray, to which I replied, “No….Sorry, yes.”  I was faster this time – with a trick question like whether or not I needed a tray, I had to be quick on my feet!  But I gave her the wrong answer. Of course I needed a tray for 3 coffees.

What happened to me?  Was I experiencing symptoms of the early stage of dementia?

My sudden inability to comprehend what was taking place is what happens when your mind is elsewhere.  It happens to salespeople when they aren’t able to stay in the moment, maintain complete focus on what their prospects are saying, and respond without thinking several moves ahead or, more typically, about what they want to talk about.  It’s a form of being emotional.

I wrote about becoming emotional last week in this very popular articleThe Top 5 Mistakes Salespeople Make When Under Pressure.  While both are examples of becoming emotional, we get there in two very different ways!  If you are day dreaming you are in your own head, and if you are getting frustrated you are in your own head. Neither scenario bodes well for selling.  For that matter, it’s extremely difficult to coach a salesperson if you are in your own head.

Speaking of coaching salespeople, my annual Sales Leadership Intensive is fast approaching!  It’s just 3 weeks away.

September 10 – 11 |  Boston Area  |  2 Days of intense sales leadership training  

If you have any interest in attending, please send me an email and I’ll make special arrangements for you.

You might have missed the article I wrote on Friday last week.  I never got so many “out of office” messages!  It was an important article on Why Inbound Cannot Replace Selling and you should read it before the next paragraph.

Not too long ago, the only options for prospecting were either to pick up the phone or knock on a door.  In 70’s and 80’s, I would do almost anything to knock on a door rather than call on the phone. It wasn’t very efficient but, back then, I was more comfortable and more effective face-to-face.  Times change and today I would choose the phone over door knocking 100% of the time.  But while there were only 2 options in the 70’s and 80’s, today there are many more.  Social Selling allows us to connect using Twitter, LinkedIn, Email, Blogs, Facebook,Google and more.  The problem occurs when people use the newest 6 options instead of the phone. Ideally, they should be using the newest 6 options in conjunction with the phone.

When people find something they like or an approach that is more comfortable for them, they tend to embrace it to the point of obsession.  But effective selling has never been about what is most comfortable or popular.  Successful selling is about what works most effectively, most of the time, for most people.  They call it best practices.

Image Copyright: dundanim / 123RF Stock Photo

Republished with author's permission from original post.

ADD YOUR COMMENT

Please use comments to add value to the discussion. Maximum one link to an educational blog post or article. We will NOT PUBLISH brief comments like "good post," comments that mainly promote links, or comments with links to companies, products, or services.

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here