Are You Worth Your Customer’s Time?

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As sales people, we are always concerned with out time. We can’t afford to waste our time, we can’t afford to have customers waste our time.

We constantly assess things to determine whether they are worth our time.

Our customers do the same. Customers are busy, they have too much on their plates and too few resources to accomplish what they want. Consequently, they are time poor.

Yet, too often we ignore that. We call blindly, interrupting their day–usually to read some scripted pitch that says, “Buy my product.” Or we drop in for check up or “Howdy” calls. Or we focus on what we want to talk about, not what the customer wants to talk about.

Or we are unprepared, we’ve made hundreds of calls before, we know our stuff, we know the standard questions, we can just wing it.

In the end, we waste the customer’s time.

And we wonder why it’s so difficult to get customers to meet with us.

The funny thing, when we are prepared, when we have something impactful to talk about, when we are focused on what the customer wants to talk about, when we make the meeting worth the customer’s time—something magic happens. It is always worth our time.

Guard your time viciously! Don’t waste your time, it’s valuable. Don’t invest in anything that’s not worth your time.

The little secret to doing this all the time is making sure what you do is worth the customer’s time!

(Thanks to Jackie Puleo for her great comment, provoking this post!)

Republished with author's permission from original post.

Dave Brock
Dave has spent his career developing high performance organizations. He worked in sales, marketing, and executive management capacities with IBM, Tektronix and Keithley Instruments. His consulting clients include companies in the semiconductor, aerospace, electronics, consumer products, computer, telecommunications, retailing, internet, software, professional and financial services industries.

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