UK Customer Experience drops from last year

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In their latest report, KPMG Nunwood revealed in the 2017 UK Customer Experience Excellence analysis that the overall score for Customer Experience in the UK has dropped, lagging significantly behind the USA. In fact, the gap between both is widening.

KPMG Nunwood surveyed 10,000 UK consumers in July 2017 on various aspects relating to customer experience. The survey ranks brands on their overall Customer Experience Excellence score, which is a weighted average of each brand’s score and is mapped against KPMG’s six metrics of personalisation, time and effort, resolution, integrity, expectations and empathy.

The overall CEE score for the UK has dropped from 7.33 in 2016 to 7.08, a record low for the UK, according to the research. Over the past year, only 8% of brands saw an increase in performance. UK customer experience performance is now behind the United States, with a score equivalent to that of the US over five years ago.

The leading brand from the report was shopping channel QVC, with a CEE score of 8.22. The company has moved up 18 places in the ranking since 2016. John Lewis Finance followed in second place, a new entrant in the top 10, with a score of 8.19, while First Direct ranked third place with 8.06.

Also making it into the top 10 were John Lewis, Lush, Emirates, Skipton Building Society, Ocado, M&S and Amazon.

Despite the success of these few, customer experience had decreased among the majority of the brands outside of the top 10, resulting in a lower overall score for the UK. From high-quality service to the best products, the level of expectations from customers in this day and age proves that organisations are finding it increasingly difficult in the fast-paced and ambitious market we now live and work in.

Interestingly and perhaps most importantly, QVC came out on top because respondents highlighted QVC’s strength in expectation management. The organisation is an example of a connected company where all departments are connected. This is an extremely common gap in organisations when the companies perception and the customer’s expectation are not aligned. This is due to many factors, one of which is when the management perception of customers wants and needs may be accurate, but this knowledge has not been applied to customer-driven performance standards. This absence of service leadership could also be a result of a miscommunication of an organisations CRM strategy to employees. This could potentially lead to customers seeking a similar product or service elsewhere.

It is now apparent that it is vital for organisations to keep up with demands and listen to customers to close the Customer Experience gap and meet expectations; the first steps in doing this is 1. to understand the value of Customer Experience and 2. to ensure a strong Customer Experience strategy is in place.

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